Incorporating the The Germantown Chronicle & The Northwest Independent

6661 Germantown Ave • Philadelphia, PA 19119 • 215-438-4000 • germantownnewspapers.com

 
 

Two Kitchen Conversations & a Community Exhibition - There's a Lot on the Table at Cliveden this Spring!

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Friday, March 11, 7:00pm

"The Food Axis: Cooking, Eating, and 1950s Domestic Architecture"

Elizabeth Cromley, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor, Northeastern University 


Includes Light Meal of Dipwiches & Soft Drinks prepared by Chef Valerie Erwin

Suggested Donation: $15


Reservations REQUIRED. Click HERE to reserve or call 215-848-1777, x223.


About this Kitchen Conversation

Professor Cromley will illustrate the changes made to the cooking and dining parts of American houses from earlier 20th century patterns to the new ideas of the 1950s. Changes in family eating patterns, furnishings for dining and kitchen spaces, changes in cooking and preserving food, new tastes in materials and colors, and inventions in foodways all contributed to a sense of modernity.


About Elizabeth Cromley, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth Cromley taught architectural history in schools of architecture for 40 years until her retirement in 2012. She is now an Emeritus Professor in Northeastern's School of Architecture. Her book The Food Axis: Cooking, Eating, and the Architecture of American Houses (University of Virginia Press, 2010) examines how houses were shaped by the presence of food and the need to store, preserve, cook, and serve foods from the 1700s to the present.


About Chef Valerie Erwin

Chef Valerie Erwin, the driving force behind the Geechee Girl Rice Cafe formerly on Germantown Avenue, is counted among Philadelphia's pioneering female restaurateurs. With Geechee Girl, Erwin brought the South Carolina Geechee cuisine created by descendants of enslaved Africans to Philadelphia. She is now pursuing other interests including consulting, writing, public speaking, catering, and addressing social justice issues in the hospitality industry.



Friday, April 15, 7:00pm

"Coming to Terms with Slavery's Kitchen-Quarters"

Douglas Sanford, Ph.D., University of Mary Washington School of Architecture


Includes Light Meal of Ham Biscuits & Ice Tea prepared by Chef Valerie Erwin

Suggested Donation: $15


Reservations REQUIRED.  Click HERE to reserve or call 215-848-1777, x223


About this Kitchen Conversation

Recent research underscores the importance of kitchen-quarters - an arrangement in which kitchen buildings were also used as living quarters for enslaved servants - in both plantation and city residences. In fact, kitchen-quarters likely comprised the most frequent type of slave housing in American cities and towns.  Doug Sanford will discuss kitchen-quarters, slave households, and how African Americans transformed these buildings and their surrounding yards into important spaces for family and community.  He will also speak about Virginia Slave Housing project's efforts to promote public awareness of the architecture of American slavery.


About Douglas Sanford, Ph.D.

Douglas W. Sanford, Professor of Historic Preservation at University of Mary Washington has conducted archaeological research in Brazil, Arizona, Pennsylvania, within Virginia at the Yorktown Battlefield, Monticello, and in the Northern Neck area. While his professional and academic career has centered on historical archaeology, over the last 10 years much of his research has focused on architectural issues of slavery and slave housing in Virginia where he studies surviving slave-related buildings.


About Chef Valerie Erwin

Chef Valerie Erwin, the driving force behind the Geechee Girl Rice Cafe formerly on Germantown Avenue, is counted among Philadelphia's pioneering female restaurateurs. With Geechee Girl, Erwin brought the South Carolina Geechee cuisine created by descendants of enslaved Africans to Philadelphia. She is now pursuing other interests including consulting, writing, public speaking, catering, and addressing social justice issues in the hospitality industry.